In the brew house, different types of malt are crushed together to break up the grain kernels in order to extract fermentable sugars, producing a milled product called grist. Milling The grist is then transferred to a mash tun, where it is mixed with heated water. The process uses natural enzymes in the malt to break the malt’s starch down into sugars. Mashing The presence of minerals is critically important to the final flavour. Soft water with low mineral levels is ideal for pilsner-style lagers. When brewing ales, it is best to have water with high levels of sulphates, calcium and other ions. Water Preparation The mash is then pumped into the lauter tun, where a sweet liquid (known as wort) is separated from the grain husks. The wort is brought to a controlled boil before the hops are added. Depending on the type of beer, the wort may be boiled up to three times. Boiling As the fermenter is filled, yeast is added. The yeast consumes the sugars in the wort and produces alcohol, flavour and carbon dioxide. Fermeting After boiling, the wort is transferred to a whirlpool where any malt or hop particles are removed to leave a liquid that is ready to be cooled and fermented. Cooling The fermented beer is transferred to the maturing tanks, where the beer settles and any sediment drops to the bottom. Maturation can take several weeks. This is also the time when the brewmaster’s carefully crafted flavours and aromas develop. Maturing The beer is filtered in order to remove all solid particles. The result is a crystal clear, brilliant and dazzling beer. Filtering Temperature, glassware, speed and angle of serve vary depending on the beer, but are all crucial to the perfect serving. Great tapsters take pride in delivering the perfect pour every time. Serving In the brew house, different types of malt are crushed together to break up the grain kernels in order to extract fermentable sugars, producing a milled product called grist. Milling The presence of minerals is critically important to the final flavour. Soft water with low mineral levels is ideal for pilsner-style lagers. When brewing ales, it is best to have water with high levels of sulphates, calcium and other ions. Water Preparation The mash is then pumped into the lauter tun, where a sweet liquid (known as wort) is separated from the grain husks. The wort is brought to a controlled boil before the hops are added. Depending on the type of beer, the wort may be boiled up to three times Boiling The grist is then transferred to a mash tun, where it is mixed with heated water. The process uses natural enzymes in the malt to break the malt’s starch down into sugars. Mashing After boiling, the wort is transferred to a whirlpool where any malt or hop particles are removed to leave a liquid that is ready to be cooled and fermented. Cooling As the fermenter is filled, yeast is added. The yeast consumes the sugars in the wort and produces alcohol, flavour and carbon dioxide. Fermeting The beer is filtered in order to remove all solid particles. The result is a crystal clear, brilliant and dazzling beer. Filtering Temperature, glassware, speed and angle of serve vary depending on the beer, but are all crucial to the perfect serving. Great tapsters take pride in delivering the perfect pour every time. Serving The fermented beer is transferred to the maturing tanks, where the beer settles and any sediment drops to the bottom. Maturation can take several weeks. This is also the time when the brewmaster’s carefully crafted flavours and aromas develop. Maturing